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Technical paper writing. live service for college students.

Indeed reserves the right to remove any posts which Indeed feels are not relevant to jobs and company search You don't necessarily need a technical writing certificate but taking a course or just for the experience (if you can find one on writing white papers in particular, headed toward college, and I need more than a shiny certificate to get a job..

Certificate or Degree for Technical Writing Get new comments by email My Email Page: Katie in New Hill, North Carolina124 months agoI made about 30K but that was about 10 years ago.

I'm sure it all depends on where you are, your education, experience and the company. Some positions in my area (Raleigh, NC) start in the mid 30s +.

Many writing jobs, especially in the pharmacuetical industry, often have higher salaries. 124 months agoThanks for taking the time to respond to my question.

After getting a certificate, I would need to find part time work since I still have my little ones running around. Hopefully, technical writing can be a way for me to use my writing skills for income.

I'm thinking about researching blogging but I'm not sure how that goes. 118 months agoPossible technical writer in Yorktown Heights, New York said: I am exploring the possibility of taking some online courses in technical writing. I have a Bachelor Degree in English and enjoy writing.

Can I obtain an entry level technical writer position with a technical writing certificate? If so, can anyone recommend a reputable program? I would like to work from home if possible. Schooling and a degree in English doesn't make a good tech writer, I don't care what college told you that. The ability to write to the user of a product clearly and concisely. The ability to understand technology quickly and to write to the correct audience.

Working from home is great but not without experience. 117 months agoTechnical writing requires many skills including the ability to change horses in mid-stream.

Working from home is not something I recommend to a novice writer, even if you could find such a position for part-time work. An understanding of the requirements of the ocmpany you work for and the abillity to know your audience is essential.

A degree in English has little to do with the requirements of technical writing! You will also want to decide what area of technical writing you are qualified for, do you have any background in software, hardware, pharmaceuticals, manufacturing, training, health care, or the military? Sorry to sound so negative but technical writing is a demanding career that will require you to approach it as a dedicated professional. 117 months agoJames Barakaat in Chicago, Illinois said: I encourage anyone who wants to break into Technical Writing to take at least one course in Technical Writing.

This is where the methodology of technical communication is taught. Many believe that a degree in English and/or knowing how to string words, sentences, and paragraphs together is enough.

It is not enough if one doesn't learn the methodology of creating technical documents.

Certificate or degree for technical writing - technical writer

I presently consult and teach for an online university You are here: writing admissions essays /Online technical writing certificate For the Technical Writer program, applicants should ideally satisfy one of the two Paper Writing Company - Purchase Online Essay Papers Of The Best Quality .

I believe that anyone with a good command of English can be a good technical writer if they learn to do the following: 1.

You do front-end analysis, You know the purpose and the audience for the documentation. You research to provide the information that satisfies the purpose for the intended audience. You organize the information and present it in a form suitable for the purpose of the intended audience. You use reader(s) as representative sample(s) of the audience to test the documentation.

You monitor and take notes to determine where the documentation works and where it doesn't work. You must make it clear to participants that you are testing the documentation and not them participants.

(Use search engine to learn more about usability testing. No matter how good you may be, usability testing is the key to determining good documentation).

You revise until the documentation works as intended.

I have seenJames, I too have been a technical writer for many years,this is one the finest descriptions of what it takes to be a technical you!109 months agoI have a strong background in medical curricula writing, mostly ghost writing for physicians for JAMA. 20 years experience as a medical professional and now looking for something less physical.

Unfortunately colleges laugh at my military education which was supposed to be equivalent to an associates degree. My patients never always requested me as physicians did.

I just find it hard to swallow that my 20 years of experience is "worthless" so I am trying to transition into a field where my experience as well as my writing skills would be an asset. My concerns are that there are so many fly-by-night online places to get a "certificate" and I am more than prepared to earn my way BUT I just don't want to get ripped off.

I am already the proud owner of several other hard-earned "certificates" (HR and Management) which aren't worth the paper they are printed on. Seems if you don't have a "degree" that you can't get your foot in the door.

How do you move past that little issue? I am looking at 50 right around the corner, three teenagers headed toward college, and I need more than a shiny certificate to get a job. This woman is not a stranger to hard work and I am more than willing to do what needs to be done---I just can't afford to be ripped off again.

Are there apprentice positions in the technical writing field?108 months agoNat Palm in Corona, California said: I have a strong background in medical curricula writing, mostly ghost writing for physicians for JAMA. 20 years experience as a medical professional and now looking for something less physical.

Unfortunately colleges laugh at my military education which was supposed to be equivalent to an associates degree.

Technical writing service. homework help sites. - pcms engineering

I just find it hard to swallow that my 20 years of experience is "worthless" so I am trying to transition into a field where my experience as well as my writing skills would be an asset.

My concerns are that there are so many fly-by-night online places to get a "certificate" and I am more than prepared to earn my way BUT I just don't want to get ripped off Results 1 - 24 of 24 - Training Courses - Our Best Words - Technical Writing. You can expect to: - learn how to get your thoughts onto paper - understand the features of and This technical writing course prepares students with the skills required for writing in a professional setting. Online Research paper about college..

I am already the proud owner of several other hard-earned "certificates" (HR and Management) which aren't worth the paper they are printed on. Seems if you don't have a "degree" that you can't get your foot in the door.

How do you move past that little issue? I am looking at 50 right around the corner, three teenagers headed toward college, and I need more than a shiny certificate to get a job. This woman is not a stranger to hard work and I am more than willing to do what needs to be done---I just can't afford to be ripped off again.

Are there apprentice positions in the technical writing field?As a Technical Writer with over 25 years experience, I'm happy to tell you that certificates and degrees don't cut it. If I applied for a writer position within the medical field I wouldn’t even get a response because all my experience has nothing to do with the that particular industry related field.

It’s much easier to train someone to use the software required to publish the documentation than to train someone of what information the end user needs. Because of your experience you know what information the end user is looking for and how it relates to the industry,95 months agoMariana in El Paso, Texas said: Many of the job postings I've applied for, however, ask for knowledge of FrameMaker and RoboHelp.

Can anyone recommend an online-course on some of these programs?You can download free 30-day demos of both programs. The great thing about documentation programs is that they come with excellent documentation.

:) FrameMaker I admittedly found confusing and unfriendly, but I was able to teach myself RoboHelp in two days. If you have a basic background in desktop publishing and Web design, RoboHelp is very easy to use and the video tutorials are very helpful.

The same goes for its main competitor, MadCap Flare (which also has a 30-day free trial). If anyone is out there looking for work as a tech writer, I cannot say this loud and often enough: DOWNLOAD THE DEMOS.

I'm in a two-year contract and I get phone calls from recruiters every other week because nobody else in my 500K-population city knows how to use Flare or RoboHelp - and they're really easy to learn.

85 months agojen in Houston, Texas said: Thank you all for the informative questions & answers. I am curious - is it foolish to think that I could begin a career in technical writing with a background in education? I am interested in the profession but do not have a technical background.

It sounds like obtaining some education, writing some samples, volunteering time, etc. all help, but is my education degree a huge mark against me? Thanks for your insight!Jen, I currently do technical writing for an educational software company.

There is a great deal of remote work for ex-educators in this industry, and not not only technical writing. If you look up the terms "subject specialist" or "curriculum specialist" you will find many opportunities.

About 5 years ago I was a project manager for a leading educational software company and managed 15+ ex-teachers who all worked from home, writing content and aligning content to educational standards. 83 months agoI have a BA in English Language and Literature. I have extensive experience in publishing, editing and proofreading skills and liaison with subject matter experts, website design, and some coding.

I write shorthand at 120 wpm, type at 80wpm and have extensive DTP skills.

I use Visio, CorelDraw, Photoshop, FrameMaker and RoboHelp very well Are you interested in enrolling in technical writing classes that come with an accredited Our graduates have the skills to work as technical and professional writers. fears, place your order here and get your quality paper in a few days Get started. Guilford Technical Community College is providing online education, .

I worked as a technical writer for several years before I decided to go to nursing school. I am now a Registered Nurse and since my graduation, have worked as a QA Nurse, working as a subject matter expert for an agency in the development of a software for remote field nurses.

I was also responsible for training the field nurses in the use of the software. I find out that my interest is more in working as a technical writer using my skills as a documentation specialist and a nurse and marrying both.

I wonder if anyone on this forum knows of opportunities that can use my diverse skills. I have extensive experience in publishing, editing and proofreading skills and liaison with subject matter experts, website design, and some coding. I write shorthand at 120 wpm, type at 80wpm and have extensive DTP skills.

I use Visio, CorelDraw, Photoshop, FrameMaker and RoboHelp very well. I worked as a technical writer for several years before I decided to go to nursing school.

I am now a Registered Nurse and since my graduation, have worked as a QA Nurse, working as a subject matter expert for an agency in the development of a software for remote field nurses. I was also responsible for training the field nurses in the use of the software.

I find out that my interest is more in working as a technical writer using my skills as a documentation specialist and a nurse and marrying both. I wonder if anyone on this forum knows of opportunities that can use my diverse skills.

80 months agoAll, I have an engineering degree and have always gravitated more towards the documentation aspect of the job. My background is designdevelopment in the medical device industry which includes tons of project management experience.

I enjoy writing and am presently considering acquiring a certificate and/or masters in technical communication. What types of job opportunities might this open up for me? I'm not quite sure where to begin to look for work.

I thought the MS Tech Comm degree or certificate at NJIT looked interesting and also the International Writing School perhaps for a quick and practical, hands on route to enter the profession. Marcomm opportunities immediately come to mind as well, but then would I need a Marketing degree? I've have researched many potential careers that I might switch to as a 2nd career at this point in life and I keep coming back to writing.

I have the technical background along with a detailed oriented nature. I am happiest when I am interviewing SMEs, researching and writing.

It's time to figure out where/how to make a living doing what I do and love best. Any words of wisdom would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks in advance!80 months agoJust a comment for English majors wanting to do technical writing. There are jobs out there for you, I wouldn't be totally discouraged by some of the comments here.

But if you want high pay it IS important to understand the subject matter.

I am currently an engineer in the Silicon Valley 4 points that need attention when writing a technical paper 4 σημαντικά σημεία need to buy a annotated bibliography technical paper writing college essay no .

There is great demand for technical writers but only those who understand the subject matter are getting the high pays, >$100/hour! Very often, these are engineers-turned-tech-writers.

Technical writing. live service for college students.

We had the hardest time finding someone to write our documents (user manuals, datasheets) for a price that my start-up can afford. Engineers generally hate to and already have too much work on their plate to write.

But in the end, I still had to generate the documents myself, and our technical writing consultant (English major) basically could only help me format it. Most competent engineers already have enough writing skills generate technical documents, it's just that they rather not do it.

So if all you have is writing and formatting skills, you will still get jobs but just won't get paid as well. 78 months agoamber in Wayne, New Jersey said: i need some info and tips on technical writing.

i havent gone to school yet and would like to know what the courses are for technical writing, how long the training is, what the work envoirment and work pace is like. is it a demanding job? what common knowledge is best for this type of career? what are good feilds to specialize in.

i know i sound ill of the subject but id just like some advice before i go to school. You dont want to go into journalism - no money in that. I got my degree in English and fell into technical writing for the gov't.

I am thinking about getting my MA in Technical and Professional Communication from ECU, but really do NOT want to take the GRE. If you want to be a tech writer and you have an english degree, just take some basic courses and get a tech writer certificate.

Or work your way into being a tech writer by first becoming a Correspondence Analysist. Once you grasp who your audience is, what the document needs to portray and finalizing the document - you should be fine.

77 months agoI'm a technical writer in the northern Los Angeles area. I was settling into a nice position when my company collapsed and terminated its staff.

Now I'm out of work and seeking the next technical writing opportunity. I think specialization in as many "hot" industries is the key--although still no guarantee--in today's especially volatile job market.

I started out with a bachelors degree in journalism and a foundation in science coursework. I worked for my first couple years in regulatory compliance (environmental/EPA) and air pollution control standards.

I went back to school for my teaching certificate and wanted to get into science curriculum design, but I got derailed. I worked for the next few years in medical services writing lab/diagnostic/pharmaceutical documents and procedures.

I also completed a couple technical programs in wind turbine technology and geographic information systems, and I have been working these angles lately. I joined a start-up and knew the risks, but job loss is still no fun.

I was enjoying the documentation responsibilities; assembly manuals; reference materials and quality analysis activities as the prototype was being built.

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One of the challenges I have found in this field is finding your niche in the "team environment" if that matters to you.

As a technical writer you really don't belong anywhere but straddle many departments Jobs 1 - 25 of 36294 - at Connecticut College shares what she hopes to find when she picks up a college essay. Illustration essay essay on importance of technical report writing for. About scientific writing in order to get a document of an acceptable clarity and structure. A successful technical writer also needs to be..

And when all the departments--management, engineering, production and the support staff--all go out for their lunch parties, the technical writer will be sitting alone in his/her cubicle. Yet, there's something to be said about solitude.

I think five months went by before the engineers realized that I wasn't the guy who took out their trash! (I added to their confusion while diligently attempting to preserve a recycling program I had started. with no industrial experience, but I always have a strong passion for writing.

I took an academic writing class and am going to take an engineeringcommunication class (undergrad level). I am not interested in R&D positions anymore and am ready to say goodbye to bench works.

Technical writing is a good direction to branch out from my academic background. When I went through those job openings, however, most of them don’t require a degree higher than Bachelor, but heavily emphasize EXPERIENCE.

I wonder if my educational background would be an overkill, while at the same time my lack of related experience will set me back. I write a lot in graduate school, but don’t use professional softwares other than Microsoft Word.

How should I put up my resume and plan accordingly? Do I need to take more writing classes or learn a software like RoboHelp? Your opinions and advises are welcome. 71 months ago QUOTE You obviously have no idea what your talking about.

I have a BA in English and just started a position in tech writing with no experience and only an English degree and I start out at way more than 30K. Peace Techone in Portland, Oregon said: Schooling and a degree in English doesn't make a good tech writer, I don't care what college told you that. The ability to write to the user of a product clearly and concisely. The ability to understand technology quickly and to write to the correct audience.

Working from home is great but not without experience. This is amazingly funny! It’s the duel of the semiliterates! On one side, we have the irritable Mr.

Too-Dumb-to-Differentiate-Between-Common-Homophones-Peace, on the other the equally snappy King.

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Many of the jobs I've seen have required some technical writing experience. I also got my undergrad degree in English and had no experience within technical writing when I got my first gig.

Look into those job a leyway into technical writing because it is the same thing so to speak, except you are moreso writing letters and responses to people about the services your company does instead of writing manuals, process guides, etc.

but this will help you gain technical knowledge and give you that experience. This lead me into my technical writing positions and now 3 years after receiving my undergrad I am a Senior Technical Writer with the gov't.

Every job you get make sure it is aiding in the experience of the technical side of the house since you already have a background in writing. in Irvine, California said: I am a fresh Chemistry Ph. with no industrial experience, but I always have a strong passion for writing. I took an academic writing class and am going to take an engineeringcommunication class (undergrad level).

I am not interested in R&D positions anymore and am ready to say goodbye to bench works. I'm in a somewhat similar situation (BS Physics, MS Materials Science, around 5 years in industry, and looking to get away from R&D).

A number of people have commented on what things are like coming into technical writing with a background in writing, rather than technology. How would things be different from someone coming in with a technical background? How much further education do I need to start looking--would a few classes be enough, or should I try for a Masters degree in Technical Writing?69 months agoThe advice on the content writing programs was very helpful and I ran to the sites to get the downloads, only wouldn't you know, that there are no Mac versions.

I hate to "bug up" my Mac with the program that runs Windows apps but if this is standard by now maybe the old days are behind would you know of Content Management programs that are used in the industry AND are Mac for the reply. JE in Des Moines, Iowa said: You can download free 30-day demos of both programs.

The great thing about documentation programs is that they come with excellent documentation. :) FrameMaker I admittedly found confusing and unfriendly, but I was able to teach myself RoboHelp in two days.

If you have a basic background in desktop publishing and Web design , RoboHelp is very easy to use and the video tutorials are very helpful. The same goes for its main competitor, MadCap Flare (which also has a 30-day free trial).

If anyone is out there looking for work as a tech writer, I cannot say this loud and often enough: DOWNLOAD THE DEMOS. I'm in a two-year contract and I get phone calls from recruiters every other week because nobody else in my 500K-population city knows how to use Flare or RoboHelp - and they're really easy to learn.

67 months agoSure, jump right in the water - it's polluted! That is, everyone thinks that technical writing is easy to master, but the plain fact is: Most technical writers drown A study of oral and written communication skills needed by biologists. Technical writing help - Online College Essay Writing Company - Purchase Top-Quality .

When considering entry into Technical Writing, The first question to ask is: AM I TECHNICAL? Do you have technical knowledge and skills? Do you know how software is developed, how electronics are manufactured, or FDA requirements for pharmaceuticals? If all you know is how to operate your PC, then technical writing isn't for you. I have been a professional technical writer for 20 years.

I've seen companies hire people with and English degrees and NO technical skills. Either they impose on other writers to help them, they quit, or they are fired. (Try putting FIRED on your resume!) IF YOU ARE NOT TECHNICAL, DO NOT, NOT, NOT TRY TO BE A TECHNICAL WRITER.

You're just setting yourself (and your family) up for failure. Sorry for the bad news, but somebody needs to tell people the truth about this field.

Very few technical writers ever land a full-time, permanent position. It's mostly contract work; 6-months to a year, then look for another job. You WILL have stretches of being unemployed (sometimes 6-8 months between jobs).

Most consulting companies provide minimal benefits. If you get sick or have an accident, your out of pocket costs are HUGE.

TIP: If you're dumb enough to go into technical writing, don't work for low pay. Remember, you've got to cover expenses while working and for the 6-8 months between jobs when you're looking for work.

Plus, you're going to have medical bills sooner or later. If you do, you'll find that you have actually lost money in long haul. Proper grammar and syntax DO NOT make you a technical writer.